Three Things to Consider Before Buying a Non-Stick Frying Pan

A simple frying pan is one of the most utilized utensils in any kitchen, so be sure you get one that doesn’t leave half your meal stuck to its surface.

Person cooking steaks in a non-stick pan
Some of the best non-stick cookware allows you to prepare food as though there’s butter or grease already in the pan.Nanxi Wei/Unsplash

You ever see someone frying an egg, effortlessly sliding it around in the pan, and then flipping it, one-handed, without ever reaching for a spatula? It’s a beautiful thing, and it’s really only possible with a quality non-stick pan. You probably some of the important non-stick rules, such as never cook on high heat, and never use metal utensils on it, but there are some factors to keep in mind when you’re weighing which pan you want to buy in the first place. Here’s a few tips on finding that one pan.

Material Matters

You want to look for pans that have a lot of aluminum in the body, because it’s a highly conductive material that spreads the heat nice and evenly across the cook surface. For the surface itself, don’t skimp. Make sure you’re getting a high-quality surface that will stay slippery and not chip away.

Can You Handle It

Cuisinart Chef's Classic Nonstick Hard-Anodized 14-Inch Open Skillet
This pan has aluminum throughout, a quantum non-stick interior, and a nice big helper handle on the back make sure you can lift that deliciousness.Cuisinart

There’s a wide variety in the types of handles you can find on these. Try to find those that come with silicone handle covers, which are easy to grip and protect your hand from the heat but are built for heavier loads. You might want to look into something that has a handle on the back, too, for extra stability.

Size Things Up

Calphalon 2 Piece Classic Nonstick Fry Pan Set
Two for the price of one, this pair of pans is made with hard anodized aluminum, dual-layer non-stick surfaces, and are even oven-save to 450 degrees.Calphalon

Think about what you might be cooking in your pan. If it’s just going to be one or two eggs at a time, then you’ll probably be best served by a small pan. But if you might be cooking a load of pancakes for the family, then you’re going to want to go bigger. Or, best of all, get both. You can frequently find a pair of differently sized pans that come in a package deal.

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